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Amy Ross

Post Doctoral Associate AC    
Education

B.S. Psychology, University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown, 2005
M.A. Psychology, Georgia State University, 2008
Ph.D. Neuroscience, Georgia State University, 2012
Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Physiology, Georgia Regents University, 2012
Postdoctoral Fellow, Neuroscience Institute, Georgia State University, 2013-present

Specializations

Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Energy Regulation
Neuroendocrinology

Biography

Amy grew up in Eighty-four, Pennsylvania, a small town outside of Pittsburgh. She earned her undergraduate degree at the University of Pittsburgh Johnstown while volunteering in the lab of Dr. John Mullennix, helping him collect data for voice perception experiments. After completing her B.S. in Psychology, Amy moved to Atlanta to start her graduate career in Dr. Marise Parent’s lab at Georgia State. While at GSU, Amy pursued her interest in memory, and studied how diet influences memory. She earned her Ph.D. in 2012 and moved to Augusta to continue studying energy regulation and brain function at Georgia Regents University with Dr. Ruth Harris. She is now back in Atlanta, working as a post-doctoral fellow with Dr. Parent and Dr. Elliott Albers. Amy enjoys watching football and is still a Steelers fan, even though she has lived in Georgia for 10 years. She also enjoys baking, painting, and FaceTiming with her niece.

Publications

Ross, A.P., Bartness, T.J., Mielke, J.G., & Parent, M.B. (2009). A high fructose diet impairs spatial memory in male rats. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 92, 410-416.

Ross, A.P., Bruggeman, E.C., Kasumu, A.W., Mielke, J.G., & Parent, M.B. (2012). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease impairs hippocampal-dependent memory in male rats. Physiology and Behavior, 106, 133-141.

Ross, A.P., Darling, J.N., & Parent, M.B. (2013). High energy diets prevent the enhancing effects of emotional arousal on memory. Behavioral Neuroscience, 127, 771-779.

Ross, A.P., Darling, J.N., & Parent, M.B. (2015). Excess intake of fat and sugar potentiates epinephrine-induced hyperglycemia in male rats. Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications, 3, 329-37.

Find Amy Ross’s Publications on PubMed